Historical Buildings

McDougall House

The McDougall family was among many Metis who relocated from the St. Boniface-St. Vital area to Lorette and other areas in Tache during the troubled years of 1868-70. Daniel McDougall, 27, found property to his liking south of the Sein River in 1869, staked his claim , and began ploughing his field.
Read More


Turenne House

Maison Turenne, formerly known as The Grey Nuns House, was built in 1870 by Joseph Turenne and is the oldest surviving house in Fort Garry. It was eventually acquired by the Grey Nuns and used by them. It was to be demolished in 1971 to make room for a senior citizens home.
Read More


Bohemier House

The Bohemier House had been built in 1890 and lived in continuously by members of the Bohemier family. In 1973, a second heritage home in St. Norbert was scheduled to be demolished to make way for an apartment block.

Read More


Delorme House

Pierre Delorme (1831 – 1912) was born at St. Boniface, Manitoba. His father was Québecois and his mother, Métis. Pierre married Adélaïde Millet dit Beauchemin and raised a family of 13 children. In the mid-1850s he settled on River Lot 21 at Pointe Coupée (St. Adolphe) south of St. Norbert, where he built the family home.
Read More


Monastery

Father Ritchot had long hoped to establish a monastery on a secluded piece of parish land along the La Salle River. In 1891, Ritchot’s hopes were realized. He and Archbishop Taché of St. Boniface persuaded the Abbot of Bellefontaine, France, to establish a home for Trappist monks in St. Norbert.
Read More


Banque d’Hochelaga

932 avenue de l’Eglise, built in 1919, once housed St. Norbert’s first bank, la Banque d’Hochelaga. You can still see the name very faintly on the wall. The building later became a hardware store and then a private residence.

Read More


St. Norbert Parish

In 1854, Father Louis LaFleche was assigned to the Mission de la riviere Salle and began to build a church. In 1857, the small mission was elevated to the status of parish and was named “St. Norbert” by Bishop Alexandre-Antonin Tache in honour of the first bishop of St. Boniface Bishop Norbert Provencher.
Read More


Outdoor Chapel

Ritchot and his parishioners built the chapel (La Chapelle de Notre-Dame-du-Bons-Secours) in 1875, to commemorate the success of the Métis resistance of 1869-70.

Read More


Asile Ritchot

The first building on this site, erected sometime in the 1870s, was the home of Joseph Lemay. On his death in 1892, it was donated to the local church and, in 1903, Father Noël-Joseph Ritchot arranged the donation of the building and surrounding land to les Soeurs de Misericorde, who operated it as an orphanage from 1904 to 1948.
Read More


Monastery Guest House

In 1988, as a result of the efforts of Heritage St. Norbert, the Province of Manitoba designated the guest house and the surrounding land as a heritage site. That same year, the guest house and adjacent five acres were purchased from Genstar with a donation from St. Norbert residents William and Shirley Loewen.
Read More


Place Saint-Norbert

At the site of the former orphanage (1905-1948), managed by the Misericordia Sisters, the Saint-Norbert Heritage Group gathered a former butcher shop, a log house, a Red River cart and the La Barrière monument.

Read More